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History, 2014-2016

  • 2015

Anne Austin received her PhD from UCLA in the Interdepartmental Archaeology Program where she focused on bioarchaeology in ancient Egypt. Through research on both texts and human remains, she reconstructs ancient Egyptian health care networks and identifies the diseases and illnesses people experienced during the New Kingdom (1550-1080 B.C.E.).

In her current research project, Contending with Illness in Ancient Egypt, she documents health and disease at Deir el-Medina—the village of the workmen who built the tombs of the pharaohs during Egypt’s New Kingdom period (1550-1080 B.C.E.)—through combining analysis of personal letters, administrative records, and medical texts with osteological research on the unpublished human remains at the site. These two data sets offer access into one of the world’s oldest health care systems, allowing us unique insight into the care and medicine used to survive in the ancient world. 

In the News

Stanford postdoctoral scholar leads the first detailed study of human remains at an ancient Egyptian site